PRESS RELEASE : Anti-gay groups waited for him at the airport but he came back: Ghanaian man fears for his life if deported on Saturday, but Immigration refused to see the evidence

MEDIA ADVISORY
Press conference
Anti-gay groups waited for him at the airport but he came back: Ghanaian man fears for his life if deported on Saturday, but Immigration refused to see the evidence
 
Ebenezer Donkoh fears for his life if he is deported a second time to Ghana this Saturday, 17 September 2016, where he says anti-gay groups want to kill him. He was deported to Ghana on 1 August 2016 after his refugee claim was refused, where he says anti-gay groups waited for him at the airport and attacked his friend. Canadian border service agency (CBSA) agent Liette Malenfant refused to look at the new evidence, including photos of his badly wounded friend, of a damaged car, and hospital and police reports. Donkoh was detained on 14 September and scheduled for deportation. His detention is being reviewed on 16 September at the Complexe Guy-Favreau, 200 Boulevard René-Levesque. His lawyer, Me Stewart Istvanffy will be there 9:15am to speak to media, as well as Sofiane Chouiter from Action LGBTQ avec les immigrantEs et réfugiéEs and Michael Ntim, who is a defender of LGBTQ rights in Ghana.  
 
Me Stewart Istvanffy, is asking the Federal Court to stay his deportation before Saturday, and to grant him access to a Pre-removal risk assessment (PRRA) so that he may remain safely in Canada. The Federal Court will be hearing his requests at noon on the same day. Donkoh and Action LGBTQ avec les immigrantEs et réfugiéEs are calling on the Minister of Immigration, the Honourable John McCallum, to intervene in the case, as they strongly believe that Donkoh’s life would be iendangered if he were to be returned to Ghana.
 
When: Friday, 16 September 2016 at 9:15am
Where: In front of the Complexe Guy Favreau, at 200 René-Lévesque Boulevard West
Who: Me Stewart Istvanffy, lawyer, Sofiane Chouiter, Action LGBTQ avec les immigrantEs et réfugiéEs and Michael Ntim, defender of LGBTQ rights in Ghana.
Contact: Cynthia Beaudry, Action LGBTQ avec les immigrantEs et réfugiéEs, 438-878-4354
 
 
PRESS RELEASE
Press conference
Anti-gay groups waited for him at the airport but he came back: Ghanaian man fears for his life if deported on Saturday, but Immigration refused to see the evidence
 
“I’m asking the minister to look at my case and the risks I’m facing in Ghana.” – Ebenezer Donkoh
 
Montreal, September 16 – Ebenezer Donkoh fears for his life if he is deported a second time to Ghana this Saturday, 17 September 2016, where he says anti-gay groups want to kill him. He was deported to Ghana on 1 August 2016 after his refugee claim was refused, where he says anti-gay groups waited for him at the airport and attacked his friend. Canadian border service agency (CBSA) agent Liette Malenfant refused to look at the new evidence, including photos of his badly wounded friend, of a damaged car, and hospital and police reports. Donkoh was detained on 14 September and scheduled for deportation. His detention is being reviewed on 16 September at the Complexe Guy-Favreau, 200 Boulevard René-Levesque. His lawyer, Me Stewart will be there at 9:15am to speak to media, as well as Sofiane Chouiter from Action LGBTQ avec les immigrantEs et réfugiéEs, and Michael Ntim, who is a defender of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) rights in Ghana.  
 
Me Istvanffy is asking the Federal Court to stay his deportation before Saturday, and to grant him access to a Pre-removal risk assessment (PRRA) so that he may remain safely in Canada. The Federal Court will be hearing his requests at noon on the same day. Donkoh and Action LGBTQ avec les immigrantEs et réfugiéEs are also calling on the Minister of immigration, the Honourable John McCallum, to intervene in the case, as they strongly believe that Donkoh’s life would be in endangered if he were to be returned to Ghana.
 
32 year-old Donkoh was working as a teacher in Ghana when he and his male partner were attacked in May 2014. His partner eventually died from his wounds, and he was forced to flee Ghana. He came to Montreal in December 2014 where he made a refugee claim. During his time in Canada, he became an active member of the West African LGBTQ community in Montreal, helping LGBTQ West African migrants connect with services and community. His claim was eventually refused, and in late July 2016, the Federal Court refused to hear his request for a stay of deportation despite strong evidence, says Me Istvanffy.
 
“Mr. Donkoh identified himself to us as an LGBTQ person since March 2015. Our mandate and obligation is to support sexual and gender minority people who are victims of oppressions, and given the new evidence, we are truly and sincerely afraid for his safety if he is returned to his country of origin. We are asking the Canadian government to review its decision in order to avoid irreparable harm if he is returned to his country.” – Sofiane Chouiter, AGIR
 
“This is a case which is a clear illustration that the request to defer removals to the CBSA is not a valid legal recourse that respects the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. This is kind of a bad joke. It’s also quite shocking to me that the Federal Court did not hear our motion to stay in July because this is a real life and death situation. I fear the Federal Court is not playing its constitutional role of protecting fundamental rights.” – Me Stewart Istvanffy

Contact: Cynthia Beaudry, Action LGBTQ avec les immigrantEs et réfugiéEs, 438-878-4354